What’s in a Name 2020 Sign Up

The challenge extends from January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020.  You can sign up any time, but only count books that you read between those dates.

Read a book in any format (hard copy, ebook, audio) with a title that fits in each category.

Don’t use the same book for more than one category.

Creativity for matching the categories is not only allowed, it’s encouraged!

You can choose your books as you go or make a list ahead of time.


Here are my ideas for this year:

2019 End of Year Survey

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This is my annual wrap up!  The past few years I’ve also completed the survey created by The Perpetual Page-Turner, but this year has been crazy since I’m currently fostering a newborn and I don’t have the energy or time for more!

Challenges in which I participated:

What’s in a Name?
A to Z
Book Bingo
Monthly Motif
R.I.P. XIV

# of books read:

53

Previous years:

81 in 2018
61 in 2017
35 in 2016
52 in 2015
58 in 2014
60 in 2013
75 in 2012
39 in 2011
30 in 2010
28 in 2009
48 in 2008
81 in 2007

Favorites (in order read):

Where the Crawdads Sing  by: Delia Owens
The Witch Elm  by: Tana French
Red Dragon  by: Thomas Harris
The Dovekeepers  by: Alice Hoffman
Good Omens  by: Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
The Silence of the Lambs  by: Thomas Harris
Tree of Life  by: Sarah Joy Green-Hart
The Cabin at the End of the World  by: Paul Tremblay
No Exit  by: Taylor Adams
The Little Stranger  by: Sarah Waters
The Missing Years  by: Lexie Elliott

Least favorite:

The Amulet Thief  by: Luanne Bennett

# of non-fiction:

3

Repeated authors:

Thomas Harris (2) (Hannibal Lecter)
Katherine Arden (3) (Winternight Trilogy)
Sarah Crossan (2) (Breathe)
Ben Aaronovitch (3) (Rivers of London)
Rick Riordan (2) (Percy Jackson and the Olympians)

 

6. A 2020 Release You’ve Already Read & Recommend To Everyone (if applicable):

 

 

If you could, I’d love you to leave some feedback for any questions you’d LIKE to see on this survey in the future that perhaps I don’t have on here!

 

What’s in a Name 2020 Challenge Sign Up

Welcome to the 13th annual What’s in a Name challenge! In years past, this challenge was hosted by Charlie at The Worm Hole. I took over for 2019 and I’m excited to host again this year!

The challenge runs from January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. You can sign up any time, but only count books that you read between those dates.

Read a book in any format (hard copy, ebook, audio) with a title that fits into each category.

Don’t use the same book for more than one category.

Creativity for matching the categories is not only allowed, it’s encouraged!

You can choose your books as you go or make a list ahead of time.

Sign up using the Mr Linky below with a link to your WIAN challenge page/post, not your main blog URL. Feel free to save and use the graphic at the top of the page! Also, link back to this sign up page in your challenge post so others can join too.

The categories below are links to each category sign up link.  Add your book review for each category so we can see what you’ve read and discover ideas as needed.

Here are the categories for 2020:

Click the Mister Linky graphic above to enter your name and/or blog name (many people use this format: Andrea @ Carolina Book Nook) and the URL to your challenge post.  If you have any issues, email me through the Contact menu at the top of my blog and I’ll manually sign you up.

Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions!  Thanks and happy reading!

Finished with What’s in a Name?

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Have you completed the What’s in a Name challenge?  Please share your post with a list of all the books you’ve completed, whether it’s your updated original sign up post or a new post.  Also, please give suggestions for next year’s challenge and any thoughts on this year’s in the comments!

I’ll be sharing the 2020 sign up on December 1st unless someone else would like to take over hosting.  I’d love to host again and already have the categories lined up, but obviously I’m not the most interactive host, especially since my family started fostering back in May.  So if someone else would like to take over I’m perfectly willing to hand over the reigns and simply participate in 2020.

The Turn of the Key

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The Turn of the Key

By:  Ruth Ware
Published:  2019
# of pages:  384
Challenges:  R.I.P.

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Goodreads description:

When she stumbles across the ad, she’s looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss—a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten—by the luxurious “smart” home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family.

What she doesn’t know is that she’s stepping into a nightmare—one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder.

Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unravelling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn’t just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music, or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn’t just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn’t even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant.

It was everything.

She knows she’s made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn’t always ideal. She’s not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she’s not guilty—at least not of murder. Which means someone else is.

Review:  This is my favorite Ruth Ware book I’ve read so far.  I enjoyed her others just fine: The Woman in Cabin 10, In a Dark, Dark WoodThe Death of Mrs. Westaway, and The Lying Game.  However, I enjoyed The Turn of the Key the most.  I haven’t read the classic The Turn of the Screw yet, but I gather this is either a retelling or has a similar storyline.

In her letter to an attorney, Rowan states she is guilty…but not of the worst crime she’s been accused of committing.  She goes on to tell the story of how she was hired as a nanny at a large modern estate in the remote countryside of England.  She’s told right off the bat that the house may be haunted, at least that’s what overly superstitious people believe.  Rowan isn’t superstitious so she doesn’t give that claim a second thought.  Not, that is, until strange things begin to occur in the house.

I definitely enjoyed this Gothic suspense and was surprised at the plot twists.  I recommend this to those who enjoy the Gothic and/or physicological thriller genres.

Why I gave this book 4/5 stars:  Interesting and suspenseful story, was able to relate to the character more than some of Ware’s other characters.

R.I.P. XIV

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The purpose of the R.I.P. Challenge is to enjoy books that could be classified as:

Mystery.
Suspense.
Thriller.
Dark Fantasy.
Gothic.
Horror.
Supernatural.
The emphasis is never on the word challenge, instead it is about coming together as a community and embracing the autumnal mood, whether the weather is cooperative where you live or not.

The goals are simple. 

1. Have fun reading.

2. Share that fun with others.

As we do each and every year, there are multiple levels of participation (Perils) that allow you to be a part of R.I.P. XIV without adding the burden of another commitment to your already busy lives.


It’s the most wonderful time of the year!!!  R.I.P. Challenge time!!!

This year I’ll be participating in:

Peril the First: 

  1. The Turn of the Key  by: Ruth Ware
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  2. The Invited  by: Jennifer McMahon
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  3. Ararat  by: Christopher Golden
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  4. The Little Stranger  by: Sarah Waters
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Peril of the Short Story:

Through the Woods  by: Emily Carroll
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Peril on Screen:

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The Cabin at the End of the World

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The Cabin at the End of the World

By: Paul Tremblay
Published:  2018
# of pages:  272
Quote: “Wen never felt more proud of herself as when she made one of her dads laugh.”

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Goodreads description:

Seven-year-old Wen and her parents, Eric and Andrew, are vacationing at a remote cabin on a quiet New Hampshire lake. Their closest neighbors are more than two miles in either direction along a rutted dirt road.

One afternoon, as Wen catches grasshoppers in the front yard, a stranger unexpectedly appears in the driveway. Leonard is the largest man Wen has ever seen but he is young, friendly, and he wins her over almost instantly. Leonard and Wen talk and play until Leonard abruptly apologizes and tells Wen, “None of what’s going to happen is your fault”. Three more strangers then arrive at the cabin carrying unidentifiable, menacing objects. As Wen sprints inside to warn her parents, Leonard calls out: “Your dads won’t want to let us in, Wen. But they have to. We need your help to save the world.”

Thus begins an unbearably tense, gripping tale of paranoia, sacrifice, apocalypse, and survival that escalates to a shattering conclusion, one in which the fate of a loving family and quite possibly all of humanity are entwined. The Cabin at the End of the World is a masterpiece of terror and suspense from the fantastically fertile imagination of Paul Tremblay.

Review:  It’s been a crazy summer at my house so I haven’t written a review in months and I feel a little rusty.  I’ll start by saying this is the first book by Tremblay I’ve read, but it won’t be the last!

Wen is 7 years old and on a vacation with her parents in a remote cabin.  Wen is introspective and compassionate and it isn’t fair that her life is suddenly and violently interrupted by a group of four strangers who intrude into her family’s vacation.  Sudden and violent are the perfect words for how the rest of the book progresses.  The reader feels horrified and helpless reading the sequence of events.

I wanted to jump into the book to comfort Wen and her dads, talk sense into the intruders, and try to change the plot.  At the same time I wanted to put the book down and save myself the horror of sharing in the story.  It’s odd how the book can manage to be filled with hopelessness and hope at the same time.

Overall the book was intense, suspenseful, and unpredictable.  I very much enjoyed reading it in spite of the violence.

Why I gave this book 5/5 stars:  Original, well-written, interesting characters, thought provoking.