R.I.P. Time!

My favorite time of year again, R.I.P. time! This is year 17! I’m excited and have a list of books I am considering……

Ghost Story by: Peter Straub (the only one on last year’s list I didn’t read)
The Children on the Hill by: Jennifer McMahon
The Hanging Tree by: Irina Shapiro
The Shadow House by: Anna Downes
Devil’s Creek by: Todd Keisling
Brother by: Ania Ahlborn
Kill Creek by: Scott Thomas
Bone White by: Ronald Malfi

As for Peril of the Real, I’m considering:
The Stranger Beside Me by: Ann Rule

Any suggestions for Peril of the Short Story and Peril of the Screen?

The Inheritance Games

The Inheritance Games

By: Jennifer Lynn Barnes
Published: 2020
# of pages: 376
Series: The Inheritance Games (#1)
Challenges: Alphabet Soup

Avery Grambs has a plan for a better future: survive high school, win a scholarship, and get out. But her fortunes change in an instant when billionaire Tobias Hawthorne dies and leaves Avery virtually his entire fortune. The catch? Avery has no idea why–or even who Tobias Hawthorne is. To receive her inheritance, Avery must move into sprawling, secret passage-filled Hawthorne House, where every room bears the old man’s touch–and his love of puzzles, riddles, and codes.

Unfortunately for Avery, Hawthorne House is also occupied by the family that Tobias Hawthorne just dispossessed. This includes the four Hawthorne grandsons: dangerous, magnetic, brilliant boys who grew up with every expectation that one day, they would inherit billions. Heir apparent Grayson Hawthorne is convinced that Avery must be a con-woman, and he’s determined to take her down. His brother, Jameson, views her as their grandfather’s last hurrah: a twisted riddle, a puzzle to be solved. Caught in a world of wealth and privilege, with danger around every turn, Avery will have to play the game herself just to survive.

Goodreads

This was a fun read and the mystery was better than I was expecting! For some reason when I checked this out from the library I was thinking it was going to be a mixture of The Hunger Games (Suzanne Clark) and Legend (Marie Lu). Obviously I just skimmed the description and looked at the title! However, rather than taking place in the future and involving an organized and widespread competition, this book takes place in present day and the “game” is within a family.

I liked the character of Avery and the teenage angst and love interests didn’t bother me as much as some YA books do. It is the first in a series, but it could also work as a standalone because it wraps up at the end and doesn’t leave the reader too desperate to read the next. I will be reading the second book because of how much I enjoyed this book. Overall I recommend this to those who enjoy YA and/or these type of mystery/puzzle stories.

Tomorrow’s Bread

Tomorrow’s Bread

By: Anna Jean Mayhew
Published: 2019
# of pages: 352
Challenges: Alphabet Soup

Goodreads review:

In 1961 Charlotte, North Carolina, the predominantly black neighborhood of Brooklyn is a bustling city within a city. Self-contained and vibrant, it has its own restaurants, schools, theaters, churches, and night clubs. There are shotgun shacks and poverty, along with well-maintained houses like the one Loraylee Hawkins shares with her young son, Hawk, her Uncle Ray, and her grandmother, Bibi. Loraylee’s love for Archibald Griffin, Hawk’s white father and manager of the cafeteria where she works, must be kept secret in the segregated South.

Loraylee has heard rumors that the city plans to bulldoze her neighborhood, claiming it’s dilapidated and dangerous. The government promises to provide new housing and relocate businesses. But locals like Pastor Ebenezer Polk, who’s facing the demolition of his church, know the value of Brooklyn does not lie in bricks and mortar. Generations have lived, loved, and died here, supporting and strengthening each other. Yet street by street, longtime residents are being forced out. And Loraylee, searching for a way to keep her family together, will form new alliances—and find an unexpected path that may yet lead her home.

As a geography major at a university in this city, I learned about the gentrification of Second Ward in the city of Charlotte, so when I saw that this book was the local library’s book club choice I was eager to read this version of history!

The story follows Loraylee, a young woman who lives in the neighborhood of Brooklyn, a black community that happens to be close to uptown Charlotte. The neighborhood is segregated for decades until local developers, government, and wealthy citizens decide that it’s a “blight” (aka: prime real estate from which they can’t monetarily gain.) In their eyes the best way to handle the run down sections is to bull doze the entire ward and rebuild it as more upscale and worthy of the new image wanted to change “downtown” Charlotte into “uptown” Charlotte. Yes, around that time Charlotte was rebranded and one major way of doing that was referring to the main area as “uptown,” which it is still referred to as now.

Loraylee is an interesting character, mainly because of how progressive she is while still appreciating her family and neighbors and their traditions. Other characters whose POVs were included were a preacher in Brooklyn dealing with the destruction of his church and its graveyard and a white woman who doesn’t live in Brooklyn, but whose husband is a member of the board in charge of the Brooklyn redevelopment. Was it super realistic to have so many characters who were open minded during that time? Maybe, or maybe not. But obviously there were people living at that time who were progressive and taking risks by interacting with other people of different races. I’m grateful they did so and set the stage for where we are now and where we will hopefully continue as a country.

Overall, I enjoyed the book and was excited to read about the city and countryside (now suburbs!) of the area I call home. At the end of the book the author clarifies what was true and what was fiction in her story. I was disappointed to read that much of the preacher character’s story about the church and graveyard mystery was fiction. I wonder if there was another cemetery that really existed in Charlotte that was affected by the gentrification. I don’t know, but it would be cool if another author would tackle the same subject from different angles!

I know this is a controversial subject, but I always appreciate authors of any gender/race writing about minorities as long as they make a visible effort to do the characters/subject justice and respect. It’s totally fine for others to disagree because I understand feeling otherwise, but that’s my personal feeling about the matter. This was an original, important, and interesting subject to write about as a historical fiction book and I’d love to see others do the same… Either about the same subject, Second Ward in Charlotte, or about gentrification in other cities. And I’d love to see authors of color write about the subject, especially if they had ancestors affected by displacement.

So overall, I recommend this to anyone who enjoys historical fiction, if only to add to knowledge and fuel the quest for other books about similar subjects.

The City of Brass

The City of Brass

By: S.A. Chakraborty
Published: 2017
# of pages: 533
Series: The Daevabad Triology (#1)
Challenge: Alphabet Soup
Quote:
“’You’re some kind of thief, then?’
‘That’s a very narrow-minded way of looking at it. I prefer to think of myself as a merchant of delicate tasks.'”

Goodreads description:

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles.

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass, a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for…

Review:

I’m not going to lie, I chose to read this book based on the cover! I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it and how well written and intricate it is!

Nahri considers herself a fairly normal human. Key word, human. Sure, she is all alone in the city of Cairo and steals and cons to survive, but she has to do what she has to do. Until one day when a djinn magically appears in front of her and changes her life forever. She can’t return to her normal life, she has to travel to a magic city called Daevabad. She isn’t who she thought she was, she has an entire history to consider that includes plenty of intrigue, conflict, and prejudice. On the flip side, it includes a lot of prestige and power.

This story is long and complicated. There were times I was a little confused, but I also appreciated that the author didn’t suddenly shovel an entire empire’s history on the reader all at once. So it took a while to start to figure things out and for it to come together. Sometimes I wondered if I missed something, but it would be explained a little later.

The synopsis sounds like a stereotypical fantasy series, but there were several original aspects and I really enjoyed the characters. This is an adult fantasy, but probably older teens would also enjoy the book. I’ve already read the second book in the trilogy, The Kingdom of Copper, and enjoyed it just as much. I recommend it to adults and young adults who enjoy fantasy.

The Sword of Summer

The Sword of Summer

By: Rick Riordan
Published: 2015
# of pages: 499
Series: Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard (#1)
Challenges: What’s in a Name? (Season), Alphabet Soup, Alphabet Soup Authors Edition

Goodreads description:

Magnus Chase has seen his share of trouble. Ever since that terrible night two years ago when his mother told him to run, he has lived alone on the streets of Boston, surviving by his wits, staying one step ahead of the police and the truant officers.

One day, Magnus learns that someone else is trying to track him down—his uncle Randolph, a man his mother had always warned him about. When Magnus tries to outmaneuver his uncle, he falls right into his clutches. Randolph starts rambling about Norse history and Magnus’s birthright: a weapon that has been lost for thousands of years.

The more Randolph talks, the more puzzle pieces fall into place. Stories about the gods of Asgard, wolves, and Doomsday bubble up from Magnus’s memory. But he doesn’t have time to consider it all before a fire giant attacks the city, forcing him to choose between his own safety and the lives of hundreds of innocents. . . .

Sometimes, the only way to start a new life is to die.

Review:

I started reading Rick Riordan’s series the same time my son did, but he far outpaced me! He’s caught up with all the series of gods and for Christmas received his newest release, Daughter of the Deep. I’m way behind, but I’ve been trying to devote more time since New Year’s to reading books my kids want me to read. So that included finishing up The Kane Chronicles and on to Magnus Chase!

It’s a little hard to review this book since I also read the next in the series immediately after and didn’t like it as much. I was split on liking the characters, I really enjoyed Hearth and Blitz, but didn’t like Sam and Magnus’s hallmates on floor 19 as much.

Overall, this was fun reading in the same style as the Percy Jackson series and I recommend it to fans of young adult fantasy.

2021 End of Year Survey

My wrap up and then The Perpetual Page-Turner‘s survey.

Challenges in which I participated:

What’s in a Name? 6/6
Alphabet Soup 20/26
Book Bingo 2 bingos, 17/25
R.I.P. XVI 6 books
Goodreads Challenge 57/65

# of books read:

57

Previous years:
59 in 2020
53 in 2019
81 in 2018
61 in 2017
35 in 2016
52 in 2015
58 in 2014
60 in 2013
75 in 2012
39 in 2011
30 in 2010
28 in 2009
48 in 2008
81 in 2007

Favorites (in order read):

The Midnight Library by: Matt Haig
Lovecraft Country by: Matt Ruff
Piranesi by: Susanna Clarke
Project Hail Mary by: Andy Weir
The November Girl by: Lydia Kang
My Sister, the Serial Killer by: Oyinkan Braithwaite
Queens of the Wyrd by: Timandra Whitecastle
The Drowning Kind by: Jennifer McMahon
The House Next Door by: Anne Rivers Siddon
The Hollow Places by: T. Kingfisher
Come With Me by: Ronald Malfi
Thorn by: Intisar Khanani

Least favorite:

The Once and Future Witches by: Alix E. Harrow
(Sad, because my favorite last year was by the same author!)

# of non-fiction:

4

Repeated authors:

Maggie O’Farrell (2)
T. Kingfisher (2)

**2021 READING STATS** By The Perpetual Page-Turner

Number Of Books You Read: 57
Number of Re-Reads: 2
Genre You Read The Most From: Fiction

best-YA-books-2014

1. Best Book You Read In 2021?
Project Hail Mary by: Andy Weir

2. Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?
The Once and Future Witches by: Alix E. Harrow

 3. Most surprising (in a good way or bad way) book you read?  
Red Dog by: Louis de Bernieres – It was my son’s book club read and I read it out loud to him, but the whole family started listening and it was actually funny, adventurous, and emotional whereas I expected it to be hokey and something only a child would enjoy.

 4. Book You “Pushed” The Most People To Read (And They Did)?
I gave my copy of A Tangled Web by: Leslie Rule to a friend and maybe she read it?

 5. Best series you started in 2021? Best Sequel? Best Series Ender of 2021?
Started: Thorn, #1 in The Dauntless Path by: Intisar Khanani
Sequel: The Throne of Fire, #2 in The Kane Chronicles by: Rick Riordan

 6. Favorite new author you discovered in 2021?
T. Kingfisher

7. Best book from a genre you don’t typically read/was out of your comfort zone?
Non-fiction is my least read genre, especially memoirs, but I really enjoyed Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by: Jenny Lawson.
I also discovered the book genre of true crime and was fascinated by A Tangled Web by: Leslie Rule.

 8. Most action-packed/thrilling/unputdownable book of the year?
The House Next Door by: Anne Rivers Siddon

10. Favorite cover of a book you read in 2021?

11. Most memorable character of 2021?
Rocky from Project Hail Mary by: Andy Weir

 12. Most beautifully written book read in 2021?
The House in the Cerulean Sea by: T.J. Klune

13. Most Thought-Provoking/ Life-Changing Book of 2021?
The Midnight Library by: Matt Haig

 

14. Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2021 to finally read? 
Dune by: Frank Herbert

 15. Favorite Passage/Quote From A Book You Read In 2021?

We don’t have to play every game to know what winning feels like. We don’t have to hear every piece of music in the world to understand music. We don’t have to have tried every variety of grape from every vineyard to know the pleasure of wine. Love and laughter and fear and pain are universal currencies. We just have to close our eyes and savour the taste of the drink in front of us and listen to the song as it plays. We are as completely and utterly alive as we are in any other life and have access to the same emotional spectrum.

The Midnight Library by: Matt Haig

16.Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2021?
Shortest: Sarah, Plain and Tall by: Patricia MacLachlan (64 pages)
Longest: Dune by: Frank Herbert (890 pages)

 17. Book That Shocked You The Most:
A Head Full of Ghosts by: Paul Tremblay

18. OTP OF THE YEAR (you will go down with this ship!)
(OTP = one true pairing if you aren’t familiar)
Alyrra & Kestrin in Thorn by: Intisar Khanani

19. Favorite Non-Romantic Relationship Of The Year:
Rocky and Ryland in Project Hail Mary by: Andy Weir

20. Favorite Book You Read in 2021 From An Author You’ve Read Previously:
The Throne of Fire by: Rick Riordan

21. Best Book You Read In 2021 That You Read Based SOLELY On A Recommendation From Somebody Else/Peer Pressure/Bookstagram, Etc.:
The House on the Cerulean Sea

22. Newest fictional crush from a book you read in 2021?
Lovis in Queens of the Wyrd by: Timandra Whitecastle
There isn’t any fan art that I can find, but she’s super badass, loyal, and strong.

23. Best 2021 debut you read?
I don’t think I read any 2021 debuts.

24. Best Worldbuilding/Most Vivid Setting You Read This Year?
This is a hard one! I think it would have to be The House on the Cerulean Sea.

25. Book That Put A Smile On Your Face/Was The Most FUN To Read?
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by: Balli Kuar Jaswal

26. Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2021?
The Midnight Library, maybe? I try to avoid books that make me cry!!!

27. Hidden Gem Of The Year?
Thorn by: Intisar Khanani


28. Book That Crushed Your Soul?
Apples Never Fall by: Liane Moriarty – the narrator being a mom who feels forgotten and left behind.

29. Most Unique Book You Read In 2021?
Klara and the Sun by: Kazuo Ishiguro

30. Book That Made You The Most Mad (doesn’t necessarily mean you didn’t like it)?
In Broad Daylight by: Harry N. MacLean – the American “justice” system repeatedly letting down basically an entire town of people.

looking-ahead-books-2015

1. One Book You Didn’t Get To In 2021 But Will Be Your Number 1 Priority in 2022?
The next book in the Kane Chronicles. My son loves it that I read the Rick Riordan series, but I really slacked off in 2021 and I need to finish this series and read the Norse gods series in 2022.

2. Book You Are Most Anticipating For 2022 (non-debut)?

3. 2022 Debut You Are Most Anticipating?
N/A

 4. Series Ending/A Sequel You Are Most Anticipating in 2022?
I try not to start series that don’t have all the books published! Is Winds of Winter coming out this year!? Or the next Patrick Rothfuss book!? I just looked and the second book of the Shades of Grey series by Jasper Fforde is set to publish this year so if that happens I’d be happy!

5. One Thing You Hope To Accomplish Or Do In Your Reading/Blogging Life In 2022?
Blog more! Read more!

6. A 2022 Release You’ve Already Read & Recommend To Everyone (if applicable):
N/A


Queens of the Wyrd

Queens of the Wyrd

By: Timandra Whitecastle
Published:
2019
# of pages:
414
Series: Shieldmothers Saga (#1)
Challenges: Alphabet Soup, Book Bingo (Love Typography)
Quote: “Never trust a silence around children. It is as unnatural as a sudden calm on the tempestuous sea, and as much a herald of unpleasant surprises to come.”

Goodreads description:

Raise your shield. Defend your sisters. Prepare for battle.

Half-giant Lovis and her Shieldmaiden warband were once among the fiercest warriors in Midgard. But those days are long past and now Lovis just wants to provide a safe home for herself and her daughter – that is, until her former shield-sister Solveig shows up on her doorstep with shattering news.

Solveig’s warrior daughter is trapped on the Plains of Vigrid in a siege gone ugly. Desperate to rescue her, Sol is trying to get the old warband back together again. But their glory days are a distant memory. The Shieldmaidens are Shieldmothers now, entangled in domestic obligations and ancient rivalries.

But family is everything, and Lovis was never more at home than at her shield-sisters’ side. Their road won’t be easy: old debts must be paid, wrongs must be righted, and the Nornir are always pulling on loose threads, leaving the Shieldmaidens facing the end of all Nine Realms. Ragnarok is coming, and if the Shieldmaidens can’t stop it, Lovis will lose everyone she loves…

Fate is inexorable. Wyrd bith ful araed.

God, I loved this book! I bought it on my Kindle when it was on sale just because I liked the cover, but it ended up being one of my favorites I read this year!

Lovis wakes up one morning to the same old, same old. Take care of her somewhat wild and willful daughter Birke and make some money at the job she works in the evening. Little does she know life is about to change…back to the way it used to be for her and her former band of shieldmaidens. Everything is familiar and yet different as she is reunified with her old friends with Birke in tow.

I loved that the protagonist is a mother. There were so many insightful quotes and observations made by Lovis and her mom friend Solveig about being a mother and balancing work/motherhood/social life, etc. I also enjoyed the characters and settings as well as the Norse mythology.

I also loved that each chapter was prefaced with a quote from modern sources cited as “The Wisdom of the Volur.” The writing style was so casual, but also descriptive. There’s a section at the end of the book that has a pronunciation guide that could be useful to read while or before reading the story, but of course I didn’t discover it until I was through. But I feel like I pronounced everything correctly inside my head and it didn’t matter.

I recommend this to lovers of fantasy and mythology. It’s geared towards adults with adult characters, but I think young adults would also enjoy the story.

Klara and the Sun

Klara and the Sun

By: Kazuo Ishiguro
Published:
2021
# of pages:
303
Challenges: What’s in a Name? (outer space), Alphabet Soup

Goodreads description:

From her place in the store, Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change forever, Klara is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans.

In Klara and the Sun, Kazuo Ishiguro looks at our rapidly changing modern world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator to explore a fundamental question: what does it mean to love?

Review:

Ishiguro is one of my favorite authors and I was happy this title could count for the What’s in a Name challenge for the outer space category!

The story is about an AI (artificial intelligence) named Klara who wants to be picked from dozens of other AIs in the store to be a human child’s friend so badly. She watches customers and people outside and muses about what it’s like to be human, how she compares to other AIs (both her own model, older models, and newer models), and emotions and interactions.

Klara ends up exactly where she and all her fellow AIs want to be, but nothing is perfect, right? Klara has a journey to take and a choice to make. She does everything correctly, but nothing is perfect, right?

Overall this story is about love, sacrifice, and humanity from a robotic memory point of view. What does it mean to be human and what does it mean to love? This would be a great book club read because it’s thought provoking and I imagine different readers would have different interpretations of what was happening throughout the novel.

I found it confusing at times and disconcerting in general. It would have been good to read it again after finishing, but ain’t nobody got time for that! I wish I could discuss more on here without spoilers. Hmm, maybe a secret post somehow that I can link from here? I will look into doing that!

What’s in a Name 2022 Sign Up

Welcome to the 15th annual What’s in a Name challenge! In years past, this challenge was hosted by Charlie at The Worm Hole. I took over in 2019 and I’m excited to host again this year!

The challenge runs from January 1, 2022 to December 31, 2022. You can sign up any time, but only count books that you read between those dates.

Read a book in any format (hard copy, ebook, audio) with a title that fits into each category.

Don’t use the same book for more than one category.

Creativity for matching the categories is not only allowed, it’s encouraged!

You can choose your books as you go or make a list ahead of time.

Sign up using the Mr Linky below with a link to your WIAN challenge page/post, not your main blog URL. Feel free to save and use the graphic at the top of the page! Also, link back to this sign up page in your challenge post so others can join too.

The categories below are links to each category sign up link.  Add your book review for each category so we can see what you’ve read and discover ideas as needed.

In 2021, choose 6 books that have titles that contain a:
(Click on the links for more examples and info)

Click the Mister Linky graphic above to enter your name and/or blog name (many people use this format: Andrea @ Carolina Book Nook) and the URL to your challenge post.  If you have any issues, email me through the Contact menu at the top of my blog and I’ll manually sign you up.

Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions!  Thanks and happy reading!

House of Hollow

House of Hollow

By: Krystal Sutherland

Published: 2021

# of pages: 304

Challenge: Book Bingo (published in 2021)

Seventeen-year-old Iris Hollow has always been strange. Something happened to her and her two older sisters when they were children, something they can’t quite remember but that left each of them with an identical half-moon scar at the base of their throats.

Iris has spent most of her teenage years trying to avoid the weirdness that sticks to her like tar. But when her eldest sister, Grey, goes missing under suspicious circumstances, Iris learns just how weird her life can get: horned men start shadowing her, a corpse falls out of her sister’s ceiling, and ugly, impossible memories start to twist their way to the forefront of her mind.

As Iris retraces Grey’s last known footsteps and follows the increasingly bizarre trail of breadcrumbs she left behind, it becomes apparent that the only way to save her sister is to decipher the mystery of what happened to them as children.

The closer Iris gets to the truth, the closer she comes to understanding that the answer is dark and dangerous – and that Grey has been keeping a terrible secret from her for years. 

Goodreads

Review:

Something rare happened to me, which is I just found a random book from my library on the Libby app. Since I’ve switched to mostly ebooks, I don’t usually browse shelves anymore. I find all my books from blogs, Goodreads, and recommendations. However, while searching for a completely different title, this book popped up in the search results and I was fascinated by the cover and checked it out.

I was pleasantly surprised to find a unique and interesting story that was also well-written! The book is about teenager Iris Hollow, who tries her hardest to live a boring life in spite of her traumatic past and spotlight searching older sisters. However, she spends a day with her next oldest sister, Vivi, and her structured life comes tumbling down. The oldest sister, Grey, is missing and the two younger sisters set out to find her.

I was impressed at how well the story ran together. There weren’t holes or things that didn’t make sense later in the timeline. If something was mentioned in passing it would very well come up again later. The dark, modern fairytale vibe isn’t usually my thing, but I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am adding it to my favorites list for this year.

Trigger warning: creepy crawly descriptions, rot/decay, bugs.

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